How Trauma Can Affect Your Window Of Tolerance


Do you find it hard to stay within a 'window of tolerance' when certain subjects are brought up? Do certain experiences knock you easily off balance and trigger you? If so, you may have experienced some trauma in your life.

I define trauma as any experience that overwhelms your capacity to cope with it in the moment and impairs your future ability to function or cope in some way. Trauma “dysregulates” you whenever you are reminded of the event in some way, even if only unconsciously. You may not have any idea why you are so worked up, but suddenly you are!

This infographic published by the National Institute for the Clinical Application of Behavioral Medicine shows in detail how trauma can affect your window of tolerance.

As shown in the above graphic, some traumatic experiences impair more than others, and some may lead you to hypo- or hyperarousal. Which experiences one finds traumatic and the degree of impairment that they cause vary from person to person. Some people may find a car accident traumatic. Others may not be fazed by that but are quite seriously traumatized by something somebody says to them at a crucial moment. Some traumas are based on one-time events, while others are more complex because they involve many experiences over a long period of time.

At Welling Psychology, I specialize in working with trauma to help people regain their sense of balance so that you can tolerate being reminded of events or experiences without becoming dysregulated so easily. If you would like to grow your window of tolerance, call 780-439-8787 to book your appointment.

Brian Welling, M.A, B.A.

Welling Psychology

Balance. Growth. Wholeness.

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 Tel: 780-222-7405 

Welling Centre

6529 111 St, Edmonton, AB  Canada T6H 4R5

 

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